Vintage building materials, practically in our back yard

I've always been fond of this style of lamp, probably because it reminds me of the ones in small rural churches. Thanks to a fellow blogger, I now know where I can get one. (Or maybe more.)

I’ve always been fond of this style of lamp, probably because it reminds me of the ones in small rural churches. Thanks to a fellow blogger, I now know where I can get one. (Or maybe more than one.)

A blog that I follow is Gorsline House (gorslinehouse.wordpress.com), which chronicles the restoration of a gorgeous old house in beautiful Prince Edward County. The owners, like us with the Manse, live in the city (though in their case it’s Toronto, not nearly as far from Prince Edward County as Montreal is from Queensborough) and generally can only visit on weekends. Every week there’s an update on the project, sometimes very upbeat on how it’s going, sometimes discouraged at problems and hiccups and things that go wrong. I read it and think: “This all lies in store for Raymond and me.” Anyway, it’s an excellent blog if you’re interested in historic-house restoration and renovation, and I recommend it.

This week’s post had something of particular interest to me, though, and it got more interesting the more I looked into it. The photo at the top of the post showed some beautiful pendant lights that had just been installed over the island in the kitchen; click here to see the photo. They are not at all unlike the lights that I discovered last week at a store in Ellsworth, Maine – I wrote about them, and you can see photos, here – and felt would be perfect for the Manse kitchen. The big difference, however, is that the ones at the Gorsline House are vintage lights, and the ones I found were brand new (though with a vintage look). Also, the author of the Gorsline House blog explains that theirs are “rise-and-fall” lights – there are counterweights on them that allow you to raise or lower them to the desired height. Brilliant!

When it comes to Port Hope vs. Cobourg – well, I choose beautiful Port Hope every time. (Photo from northumberlandshoptalk.com

When it comes to Port Hope vs. Cobourg – well, I choose beautiful Port Hope every time. (Photo from northumberlandshoptalk.com)

But even more brilliant was what I found when I clicked on the link that Gorsline House gave to the company the lights came from, called Legacy. It turns out that Legacy Vintage Building Materials is located in Cobourg, Ont., a place I know (or used to, anyway) like the back of my hand as a result of living and working for many years in neighbouring Port Hope. (Don’t even get me started on the longstanding Port Hope-Cobourg rivalry, except to say that Port Hope rules.) And – bonus – Cobourg is not that much more than an hour away from Queensborough. And a place we’re likely to be near fairly often since quite a few members of my family live in Port Hope.

I look forward to checking out Legacy’s supply of vintage lights, flooring, doors, windows, fencing, etc. etc. etc. Click here and you can have a fun look at the inside of their premises and the cool stuff that’s there. Surely the Manse needs some of it!

And right off the bat I think I have found something I need: the lamp in the photo at the top of the post. It’s billed as a schoolhouse lamp, and it may very well be; what it reminds me of, though, are the lamps hanging from the ceilings of many a small country church that I’ve been in over the years. I always liked their simplicity, and thought that one of them – not too big – would be perfect for, say, an entranceway or hallway. As you might imagine, I’ve got in mind a couple of places that would be perfect for that lamp at the Manse!

4 thoughts on “Vintage building materials, practically in our back yard

  1. I remember them as schoolhouse lights…so glad you’ve discovered Legacy. All our old-house friends speak highly of the place. Ah the things you get left out of, when you live in a modern condo.

    • Good to hear the recommendation on Legacy, Lindi. I find it amusing, as someone who used to be utterly plugged in to all things heritage in the Port Hope-Cobourg area, that I am apparently the last person to find out about this great resource!

  2. Katherine,
    Make sure that the wiring is up to date and safe before you install vintage lights. Old insulation is often hazardous.

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