A brief word about Christmas

Christmas morning at the Manse, looking out from the front porch: the snow was sparkling white in the brief bit of glorious sunshine that broke up an otherwise cloudy few days.

Christmas morning at the Manse, looking out from the front porch: the snow was sparkling white in the brief bit of glorious sunshine that broke up an otherwise cloudy few days.

My brother John (left), my brother Ken (centre) and my brother-in-law Greg strategizing over a rousing game of Ker-Plunk (I am not making this up) in the Manse living room prior to Christmas dinner.

My brother John (left), my brother Ken (centre) and my brother-in-law Greg strategizing over a rousing game of Ker-Plunk (I am not making this up) in the Manse living room prior to Christmas dinner.

I feel like a churl having said next to nothing about how Christmas at the Manse went, especially after so many of you sent kind wishes that it be a happy day for my family as they gathered there for the first Christmas in more than 30 years. And now it feels a little late in the game to be writing about it, Christmas being well over and all. (And don’t you find, by the way, that by the time Christmas is over you’re rather glad of the fact? What with all the advance work, it does seem to drag on…)

But anyway, the real reason for my tardiness in writing about Christmas is that, as I hinted in yesterday’s post, Raymond and I really were quite sick with cold and flu at Christmas – sicker than we let ourselves believe, sicker than we let on to others, and sicker than we even realized till now, a few days later, when we’re finally starting to feel better.

Under the tree, Christmas gifts – in turquoise!

Under the tree, Christmas gifts – in turquoise!

Nevertheless we hosted the clan, and the clan came (one of them, one of my sister Melanie’s boys, also down with the flu), and a nice time was had by all. The Manse was as spiffed-up as a house very much in need of a reno can be, the tree looked beautiful, there was a modest supply of gifts under it, and there was a turkey dinner cooked largely by Raymond within the constrictions of the Manse’s tiny pantry. And a flaming Christmas pudding and a buche de Noël for dessert. No one went away hungry.

Melanie put it nicely in a thank-you note she sent me the other day when she was herself starting to come down with the same bug that had struck Raymond and me: “Next time … which will be soon, I hope. Many more parties at the manse in the days ahead!”

Now that’s the spirit!

6 thoughts on “A brief word about Christmas

  1. Interesting that your crowd played Ker-Plunk, while ours played Killer Bunnies… But it sounds just like Christmas should be!

  2. Sounds wonderful Katherine! Snow, games, turkey, family – that’s pretty much the recipe for a perfect Christmas. The flu, not so much. Hope everyone has recovered.

    And of course, haPPY New Year!

  3. A bit of a cruel joke, that flu bug, when you had so looked forward to a perfect Christmas. Hey, it WAS perfect, you in your manse, your loved ones with you and presents under the tree! We so share your joy. I believe it gives everyone in the community a warm feeling to see you two settling in to your country home. We would love to have you back to the Money Pit for another chat. Let us know what weekends you will be there. We will probably head to South Carolina (sans guns) by early Feb….Love, GnG

    • It did seem a bit harsh, that flu visitation on Christmas, but you know, you learn from everything. And I think what we learned from this was: just take it easy. Life’s too short not to. We would love to have the grand tour of your Money Pit and learn some lessons for ours! Will suggest some dates as soon as we know when we will be back. Meanwhile, we are envying you that South Carolina getaway…

      Happy New Year, G&G – and thank you for all your moral support in Year 1 of The Great Manse Project!

      K&R

      Sent from my iPhone

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