Christmas cards on display, in traditional Manse fashion

Christmas cards 2016 at the Manse

Some of the beautiful Christmas cards that Raymond and I received this year, on traditional display at the Manse. We had to use three separate door frames to display them all. Thank you, everyone – and Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas from all five of us – Raymond and me, plus kitties Honey Bunny, Sadie and Beauregard – at the Manse. (I’m sending out my weekly post a day early so I can say that while it’s still Christmas.) I hope that as I write this, on what is for us a very quiet and pleasant Christmas night, you too are enjoying a quiet and pleasant Christmas night.

Sadie and winter wonderland

Sadie is one of the three Manse cats who join Raymond and me in wishing you a happy Christmas season.

And hey – thank you for all the nice Christmas wishes we have received from you! Some have come as face-to-face wishes, and some in comments here at Meanwhile, at the Manse; some as emails – and some as Christmas cards! I love Christmas cards, old-fashioned though I suppose they now are.

Raymond and I really enjoy receiving Christmas cards. We read each one carefully, and then put it on display in exactly the same way that my mum did in the long-ago days when I was a kid growing up at the Manse and, as the minister’s family, we received a gazillion Christmas cards.

Should you want to copy the Manse technique (by way of Lorna Sedgwick, my mum) for Christmas-card display, here’s what you do:

You take a roll of masking tape (something my dad, The Rev. Wendell Sedgwick, always had ready to hand), and you unroll a strip that’s exactly the length of the frame atop the door opening in your living or dining room. You tack it, sticky side out, at each end (and maybe a few places in the middle, if it’s a long opening and the tape is sagging). Then you run vertical strips down both sides of the door opening. And then you stick up the cards! The ones that open from the top get stuck along the top of the doorway, and the ones that open from the side go along the sides. (Raymond thought I was being too picky when I insisted on that separation of card placement by opening direction on our first couple of Christmases at the Manse, but since it was my mum’s way and I am a determined person, I have prevailed.)

And voilà! You have a lovely addition to the Christmas decor at your house. And every card on display reminds you of the nice person or people who sent it, and the seasonal wishes they included.

It’s a Christmas tradition from the Manse of the 1960s and ’70s that I am thoroughly tickled to have revived in the Manse of the 21st century.

Thank you again to all of you for your wonderful Christmas wishes. They make me want to do a Christmas dance! Want to join in? Here goes, and again, merry Christmas!

The future of our school: please mark Jan. 17 on your calendar

turkey-dinner-at-madoc-township-public-school-december-2016

It is a Christmas tradition at Madoc Township Public School to serve a full turkey dinner to parents and other members of the school community each December. Here’s one photo from this year’s event, which happened in the school gym last Tuesday. (Hey, I remember when that gym was built! It was a big event!) You can see more photos of this and other activities at our wonderful rural school at its Facebook page, here. (Photo from the Madoc Township Public School Facebook page)

It’s been a while since I posted about the threat to Madoc Township Public School, the small and excellent rural elementary school that children from Queensborough, Madoc Township and surrounding areas have been attending for many decades. As everyone in my immediate geographic area knows, the local public board of education, the Hastings Prince Edward District School Board, is proposing to close MTPS as of the end of the current school year and start busing its students to the playground-challenged Madoc Public School in the village of Madoc. (For those of you who are further away and perhaps less personally invested in this community issue, my earlier posts explaining it all are here and here.)

Me in front of Madoc Township Public School

Me in front of my old school a few summers ago.

Anyway: the threat has certainly not gone away. The school board continues with its process, which is called (in classic education-bureaucracy-speak) an “accommodation review” as opposed to what it really is, which is: a proposal to close a school.

(In a wonderful bit of – what? irony? coincidence? – Madoc Township Public School was recently placed atop every other school in the board’s jurisdiction for student achievement in reading, writing and math in the annual national survey done by the Fraser Institute, a conservative think tank. [I always wonder when I hear that phrase: why do they think in tanks, of all places?] Teachers and education administrators routinely pooh-pooh the Fraser Institute’s reports; parents, who care about their kids’ achievements in reading, writing and math – not so much. For me, the results reinforced what I already knew about the quality of the teaching and learning at Madoc Township Public School, having experienced them first-hand from Grades 1 through 6.)

Anyway, back to the “accommodation review.” Advertisements about what happens next have appeared in the local newspapers in the past couple of weeks. Probably many of the people who care deeply about Madoc Township Public School have seen these ads, but since paper delivery can be spotty (don’t get me started), and since not everybody reads the ads, I thought it would be useful to draw them to your attention here at Meanwhile, at the Manse. So here we go, and I’ll go into some of the details below. (Click on the image if you want/need to see it larger.)

Madoc schools "accommodation process"

What this tells you is this: the board is asking for people – parents and other folks from the local community – to put their names forward to be members of what it calls an “accommodation review committee.” The committee’s mandate is to “act as an official conduit of information shared between the school board and the school communities.” One can only hope that this translates to “share the feelings of the community with the board” and not just “try to make the board’s message about closing Madoc Township Public School more palatable to the community.”

I hope there are people willing to put their names forward to be on the committee. If you happen to be one of them, don’t delay; the deadline to apply is this coming Thursday, Dec. 22. More information about the process can be found here.

So that’s one important thing. Probably even more important is the first public meeting that the board has scheduled to talk about the proposed closure and related moves of students to Madoc Public School and Centre Hastings Secondary School. As you’ll see in the right-hand column of the newspaper ad, that meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 17, at 6:30 p.m., in the gym at CHSS in Madoc.

As a former education reporter, I can tell you that public meetings of this sort can have a big impact on final decisions by school boards. If people who care about Madoc Township Public School show up in good numbers, speak respectfully but knowledgeably (having done their research and carried out their discussions with fellow members of the community), and decline to back down in the face of what is likely to be a “Sorry, but this is the only way” message from the board and its administrators – it can and will make a difference.

As a former student and proud graduate of of Madoc Township Public School, and a current member of the local school community (and supporter of the public school board through my property taxes), I plan to be there.

I hope you do too.

A Christmas card from Queensborough

Christmas card from Queensborough

The historic little wooden church (formerly St. Peter’s Anglican, our village’s first church, now a private residence), the river that runs through our “downtown,” a light dusting of snow and a pretty ornament to celebrate the season: it’s a Queensborough Christmas!

I went for a quick tour of our perfect little Christmas village yesterday with the intent of photographing the work that our hamlet’s beautification committee has done once again this year to make Queensborough look like – well, like the perfect little Christmas village. Once I got home and looked at the photos, it struck me that they would make a nice Christmas card from Queensborough. So to all of you lovely readers who live in Queensborough, or who once lived in Queensborough, or who wish you could live in Queensborough; to all of you who visit us here in Queensborough; and to all of you who live too far away to visit but have sent your interesting stories and good wishes and kind thoughts Queensborough’s way – well, Merry Christmas!

I’d been thinking about taking some photos of the beautification committee’s work because of the pretty wreaths the beautification volunteers had put on a “Welcome to Queensborough” sign that I see every day on my drive home from work. Here in these shortest days of the year that drive is always in the dark, and so I’d been saying to myself, “Self, get out there and get a daylight photo on the weekend!” And yesterday I finally did:

Christmas sign, west entrance to Queensborough

Welcome to Queensborough! The seasonally decorated sign at the western entrance to our village. Over the little hill that you can see in the near distance, you drive into a pretty little dip past historic buildings (the old one-room schoolhouse, the former Roman Catholic Church) and beautifully decorated homes. Did I mention that we live in a perfect little Christmas village?

I also checked out the signs at two of the three other entrances to the village (yes, all roads – north, south, east and west – lead to Queensborough), and was delighted to find that each had been decorated in a different style. Here’s the sign at the eastern entrance, with its gold wreaths and ribbons:

Christmas sign, east entrance to QueensboroughAnd here’s the one at the northern entrance. I have a particular fondness for this sign because a) it’s the newest one, designed and made right here in Queensborough by our own brilliant metalsmith Jos Pronk (also the new chair of the beautification committee); and b) it has the backstop from Queensborough’s old ball diamond in the background. Bring back village ball teams, I say!:

Christmas sign, north entrance to QueensboroughHere’s a photo from the heart of “downtown” Queensborough, showing the dam over the Black River (thankfully, in this year of terrible drought, with water going over it) and our seasonally decorated made-in-Queensborough street signs:

Christmas in downtown Queensborough

And here is the corner of Queensborough that Raymond and I call home, the intersection of Bosley Road and King Street where you’ll find the Manse:

Christmas at Bosley and King, Queensborough

I like this photo because it’s so Queensborough. An old fence. Trees. Attractive made-in-Queensborough signs. And pretty seasonal ornaments, put up by people who just want to make our beautiful village that much more beautiful.

Queensborough and Christmas: they just go together. Don’t you think?